"Where there is doubt, there is freedom"

Flag Counter

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Y'alls a bunch of butts with 112,290 notes

unclefather:

this is the scene of the crime

unclefather:

this is the scene of the crime

Source: memewhore

15th September 2014

Link reblogged from Where Your Bullshit Comes to Die with 100 notes

Autism is Different for Everyone →

snowflakegraveyard:

Recently, there has been a lot of controversy surrounding the organization Autism Speaks due to their stance on curing autism. Many people consider autism part of their identity and don’t desire to be rid of it. However, they’re not taking into consideration the large population of autistics who…

15th September 2014

Link reblogged from You can't just redefine words with 100 notes

http://autisticfandomthings.tumblr.com/post/97612503520/snowflakegraveyard-sandyman21-autism-is →

snowflakegraveyard:

sandyman21:

Autism is Different for Everyone

snowflakegraveyard:

Recently, there has been a lot of controversy surrounding the organization Autism Speaks due to their stance on curing autism. Many people consider autism part of their identity and don’t…

Source: snowflakegraveyard

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Star Trek things with 28 notes

startrekstuff:

[Download at source]

startrekstuff:

[Download at source]

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Star Trek things with 162 notes

15th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Star Trek things with 66 notes

startrekstuff:

What if Pixar did Star Trek? (This may be the best thing I have ever seen in my life…)

By artist Phil Postma.
More pictures and source: Pixar Boldly Goes

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Star Trek things with 183 notes

startrekships:

Voyager

startrekships:

Voyager

Source: wall.alphacoders.com

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Star Trek things with 2,009 notes

livefastandprosper:

I need this on a t-shirt. And a throw pillow. And a tote bag. And maybe a hoodie for good measure.
(via Star Trek Jam Band Art Print by Jessica Fink | Society6)

livefastandprosper:

I need this on a t-shirt. And a throw pillow. And a tote bag. And maybe a hoodie for good measure.

(via Star Trek Jam Band Art Print by Jessica Fink | Society6)

Source: society6.com

15th September 2014

Quote reblogged from "we are women: fear is as familiar to us as air." with 285 notes

I already have a kid. I know exactly how long an ultrasound takes, and it damn sure isn’t 5 minutes

What a client said to me as we were walking to the clinic.  One of the crisis pregnancy center’s volunteers always says “Just take 5 minutes and get a free ultrasound”.  Of course they know it doesn’t take five minutes.  Its all about trying to get you to miss your appointment, then pour on the guilt.

Lies, Shame, and Deception. That is what crisis pregnancy center’s (CPC) are best at.

(via shitantichoiceprotesterssay)

Source: shitantichoiceprotesterssay

15th September 2014

Post reblogged from What does it matter with 224,371 notes

me

osjecam:

sorry i’m late, professor. i’m disenchanted with the human experience and waking up every morning thrusts me into an instant existential crisis

Source: osjecam

15th September 2014

Quote reblogged from What does it matter with 8,486 notes

Telling [children] that sex is ‘only between mommies and daddies’ is a lie that leads to confused, hormone-charged teenagers. Telling them that sex is ‘only something that happens when two people love each other very much’ is a lie that causes hormone-charged teenagers to confuse ‘love’ with ‘lust,’ or ‘obsession.’ It leads to leaps of logic like, ‘If I have sex with this person, we must be in love.’ Or worse: ‘If I love this person, I have to have sex with him or her.’

Lea Grover, "This Is What Sex-Positive Parenting Really Looks Like," HuffPosts: Parents (29 July 2014)

The last sentence!!

(via swampgallows)

Source: zarggg

15th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from What does it matter with 34,274 notes

sidneyia:

cynwhy:

engagedbbw:

joodleeatsrainbows:

dorkinthefreakkingdom:

kittiecupcakes:

the-lizard-hunter-sociopath:

And my personal favorite:

Popcorn guy is my favorite.

okay seriously in the extended pictures, WHAT THE FUCK IS THE FAMILY COMPLAINING ABOUT WITH THE PIZZA ON THE TABLE? LIKE SERIOUSLY WHAT

I like the last one “Oh my god, I’m on fire? Better jump out a fucking window then.

I’ve said it 100 times, I FUCKING LOVE INFOMERCIAL PEOPLE SO MUCH!!

I can’t stop laughing at the food container cupboard one.

"Is nothing easy?"

apparently fucking not

Source: the-lizard-hunter-sociopath

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from with 9,130 notes

Tagged: gore

Source: dark-ofelia

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Mind Blowing Science! with 43 notes

mindblowingscience:

Human brain gene Foxp2 makes mice smarter in some ways

Although it’s far from the sort of brain transplant beloved by science fiction enthusiasts, scientists have taken one step in that direction: they have spliced a key human brain gene into mice.
In the first study designed to assess how partially “humanizing” brains of a different species affects key cognitive functions, scientists reported on Monday that mice carrying a human gene associated with language learned new ways to find food in mazes faster than normal mice.
By isolating the effects of one gene, the work sheds light on its function and hints at the evolutionary changes that led to the unique capabilities of the human brain.
For the study, scientists used hundreds of mice genetically engineered to carry the human version of Foxp2, a gene linked to speech and language. In a 2009 study, mice carrying human Foxp2 developed more-complex neurons and more-efficient brain circuits.
Building on that, neuroscientists led by Christiane Schreiweis and Ann Graybiel of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology trained mice to find chocolate in a maze. The animals had two options: use landmarks like lab equipment and furniture visible from the maze (“at the T-intersection, turn toward the chair”) or by the feel of the floor (“smooth, turn right;” “nubby, turn left”).

Mice with the human gene learned the route as well by seven days as regular mice did by 11, scientists reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Summary of the paper in PNAS
Surprisingly, however, when the scientists removed all the landmarks in the room, so mice could only learn by the feel-of-the-floor rule, the regular rodents did as well as the humanized ones. They also did just as well when the landmarks were present but the floor textiles were removed.
It was only when mice could use both learning techniques that those with the human brain gene excelled.
Language gene may increase cognitive flexibility 
That suggested, Graybiel said, that what the human gene does is increase cognitive flexibility: it lets the brain segue from remembering consciously in what’s called declarative learning (“turn left at the gas station”) to remembering unconsciously (take a right once the floor turns from tile to carpet).
Unconscious, or procedural, learning is the kind the feel-of-the-floor cue produced: the mice didn’t have to consciously think about the meaning of rough or smooth. They felt, they turned - much as people stop consciously thinking about directions on a regular route and navigate automatically.
"No one knows how the brain makes transitions from thinking about something consciously to doing it unconsciously," Graybiel said. "But mice with the human form of Foxp2 did much better."
If Foxp2 produces the cognitive flexibility to switch between forms of learning, that may help explain its role in speech and language.
When children learn to speak, they transition from consciously mimicking words they hear to speaking automatically. That suggests that switching from declarative to procedural memory, as the humanized mice did so well thanks to Foxp2, “is a crucial part of the process,” Graybiel said.

mindblowingscience:

Human brain gene Foxp2 makes mice smarter in some ways

Although it’s far from the sort of brain transplant beloved by science fiction enthusiasts, scientists have taken one step in that direction: they have spliced a key human brain gene into mice.

In the first study designed to assess how partially “humanizing” brains of a different species affects key cognitive functions, scientists reported on Monday that mice carrying a human gene associated with language learned new ways to find food in mazes faster than normal mice.

By isolating the effects of one gene, the work sheds light on its function and hints at the evolutionary changes that led to the unique capabilities of the human brain.

For the study, scientists used hundreds of mice genetically engineered to carry the human version of Foxp2, a gene linked to speech and language. In a 2009 study, mice carrying human Foxp2 developed more-complex neurons and more-efficient brain circuits.

Building on that, neuroscientists led by Christiane Schreiweis and Ann Graybiel of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology trained mice to find chocolate in a maze. The animals had two options: use landmarks like lab equipment and furniture visible from the maze (“at the T-intersection, turn toward the chair”) or by the feel of the floor (“smooth, turn right;” “nubby, turn left”).

Mice with the human gene learned the route as well by seven days as regular mice did by 11, scientists reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Surprisingly, however, when the scientists removed all the landmarks in the room, so mice could only learn by the feel-of-the-floor rule, the regular rodents did as well as the humanized ones. They also did just as well when the landmarks were present but the floor textiles were removed.

It was only when mice could use both learning techniques that those with the human brain gene excelled.

Language gene may increase cognitive flexibility

That suggested, Graybiel said, that what the human gene does is increase cognitive flexibility: it lets the brain segue from remembering consciously in what’s called declarative learning (“turn left at the gas station”) to remembering unconsciously (take a right once the floor turns from tile to carpet).

Unconscious, or procedural, learning is the kind the feel-of-the-floor cue produced: the mice didn’t have to consciously think about the meaning of rough or smooth. They felt, they turned - much as people stop consciously thinking about directions on a regular route and navigate automatically.

"No one knows how the brain makes transitions from thinking about something consciously to doing it unconsciously," Graybiel said. "But mice with the human form of Foxp2 did much better."

If Foxp2 produces the cognitive flexibility to switch between forms of learning, that may help explain its role in speech and language.

When children learn to speak, they transition from consciously mimicking words they hear to speaking automatically. That suggests that switching from declarative to procedural memory, as the humanized mice did so well thanks to Foxp2, “is a crucial part of the process,” Graybiel said.

15th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from FY Springfield with 650 notes